I agree with Obama

It’s not often that I find myself agreeing with the actions or statements of President Obama – I think of him as a later day Jimmy Carter figure – but his recent comments made during a speech in Kenya were worthy of my approval and yours.

US President Barack Obama (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
US President Barack Obama (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Obama dared to berate, albeit very politely, the Kenyan President (Uhuru Kenyatta) in public over the issue of gay rights in Kenya. The response was: “Maybe once, like you have, [we’ve made progress] on some of these challenges, we can begin to look at new ones. But as of now, the fact remains that this issue is not really an issue that is in the foremost mind of Kenyans.”

To me that translates into the following:

  1. Keep your Yankee nose out of our society.
  2. If we want to mistreat people because of their sexuality then that’s our nation’s prerogative.
  3. There’s nothing you can do about how we treat gay people in Kenya so shut the f^&k up about it.

It does look like Barack Obama has stirred up a bit of a hornet’s nest in Kenya. He’s dared to publicly embarrass their president over an issue that they obviously feel uncomfortable about. Or should that be “feel guilty about”?

A quick scratching of the service soon shows what is really behind the homophobia of Kenya, and probably many other African countries, religion. In this case it’s Christianity but it could have been of the mainstream religions which are in the habit of spreading their poison into the minds of the sheeple.

So what can we do? I want to see any African nation, or any nation anywhere else for that matter, that doesn’t grant gay people the same rights and privileges as heteros blocked from receiving Western state aid until they change their barbaric practices.

As I am totally against “overseas aid” programmes, where taxpayers’ money is poured down the drain to appease the faux guilty conscious’ of countless liberals, then why not just take this opportunity to end all such programmes? That could save the UK taxpayers roughly £12 billion a year. How many UK NHS hospitals would that pay for? How many poor UK citizens could be supported with that kind of money?

Remember, charity begins at home.

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